Costumes and Performances by Tab Kimpton

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A Tale of Two Doctors, Part 9- Shoulder pads and lining

I’m currently tailoring a jacket that isn’t going so well, so here’s a tutorial to perk me up about costumes!
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Onward to inserting the lining!

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Best Sewing Trick of 2015!

BREAKING NEWS COSPLAYERS.
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If you load your bobbin with embroidery thread, and sew from behind you can sew couching on machine in a fraction of the time by hand.

THIS IS MY GREATEST DISCOVERY SINCE FREEZER PAPER.

I found this while (being the exciting person I am) I was watching brother foot attachment videos. You don’t need to buy anything new to do this, just watch this video for more details

 

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A Tale of Two Doctors- Part 8-Collar and lapels

 

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Next step is sewing the lapels in and trying to get a beautiful crisp edge.

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A Tale of Two Doctors- Part 7-Collar and lapels

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Time to add those classic collar pieces!

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A Tale of Two Doctors- Part 6- Canvas, horsehair and pad stitching.

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I’ve always wanted to do the fancy tailoring thing where you use a pick stitch to roll the lapel and get a smooth curve- well here it is!

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A Tale of Two Doctors- Part 5- Pockets that are bigger on the inside

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A bit of research later and turns out the back thingy on coats is called a tab- yet another thing to add to my name sake!

Now it’s time to make the pocket lining- an an opportunity to make some huge, decent sized pockets that you can actually fit useful things inside. A pet peeve of mine is fake pockets, or even worse pockets so tiny that you can’t even fit a standard phone inside.

 

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A Tale of Two Doctors- Part 4, Pockets and the Mystery Back Piece…

So, time to make those pretty pocket pieces!

 

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I cut some dark felt out to help line the spoon flower fabric and give it more weight.

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Now the secret of this task- invisible hem tape! I used it to iron the check, felt and lining layers all together in a sandwich of power.

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A Tale of Two Doctors- Part 3, The Master Coat Cutting

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The mock up came back from the customer- we had some issues on the arm placement and the back needed to come in a bit so I made some adjustments then started scribbling! Labelling is super important for this project or you’ll just get lost in a sea of slightly triangular pattern pieces.

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A Tale of Two Doctors- Part 2, the pattern

Now onto the pattern! Some of these fabrics are really expensive so I needed to make sure the coat fit properly. This is the epic tale of scaling the pattern up to the commissioners size and constructing it in linen. I chose linen because I’d be using that as the support lining for the flimsier bits of fabric and would give me a good idea of fit and a great surface to write on!

I started with a burda 2471 and massacred it. I bought a bunch of these a few years back for a set of Full Metal Alchemist uniforms I made so I happen to have one cut to most men’s sizes. Here I’m working with a 38″ chest and someone about 5’8″.

 

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I joined the seams up to create a back panel, moving the shoulder seam to a more normal place. To be honest it would have been easier to start from scratch but WHATEVER, let me have my weird ways.


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I then split the back panel and removed a slither at the waist. I think it’s important that a man’s coat is tailored to show off his… assets.

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The magical world of pinning a concave curve to a convex one. The key seems to be to have the convex curved piece on the bottom and pin

the concave (one that curvesĀ in) on top, using many, many pins to gather it.

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Ironing this is extremely satisfying. You can clip the seam to reduce the bulk but I think that weakens the seam and I didn’t want to risk fraying here.

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This back is a tailors dream, seriously.

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A Tale of Two Doctors- Part 1, the research.

I still make costumes, I promise! Things have been busy what with house viewings and packing, but I’ve still been making things behind the scenes.

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This project is the last commission I took on before closing down ready for moving. But why a Tale of Two Doctors? Well that’s because my dearest chum Christian is a massive Dr Who fan, and has always wanted a 6th Doctor Coat. So while I make a coat for this commissioner, Christian will be making his own coat, using slightly simpler techniques.

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Christian and I wearing our Blackadder costumes- Christian’s first ever sewing project!

We’re going to call them the Master and Apprentice coat, with tutorials for both. But first, the most important part of costume making- the research and fabric finding!

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